September 2014

Used clothing/textile recycling kick-off event collects nearly
6,000 pounds from Rhode Island residents

The Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) says it collected nearly 6,000 pounds of used clothing and household textiles at its recent kick-off event for its new household textile and used clothing educational campaign. The RIRRC, in partnership with all clothing collection companies in the state and SMART wants the Rhode Islanders to place their used clothing in collection bins found throughout the state.

"We want everyone in Rhode Island to know that their first thought when getting rid of unwanted textiles should be to recycle, not to put those valuable items in the trash," says Sarah Kite-Reeves, director of recycling services at RIRRC. "Recycling textiles in clothing collection bins found throughout the state reduces the amount of waste buried at the Central Landfill, reduces municipal landfill disposal fees, and gives local charitable organizations and businesses the assets they need to hire more employees and increase their revenue."

RIRRC brought together eight companies and organizations in Rhode Island that collect textiles: Big Brothers Big Sisters, Goodwill, Kiducation, Mint Green Planet, Planet Aid, Recycling Associates, Salvation Army, and St. Vincent de Paul. All of these organizations have or will be adding stickers to their collection bins to continue to educate the public on what they will accept for processing. Regardless of the condition of their unwanted clothing Rhode Islanders should now utilize one of the newly labeled collection bins. As long as the textiles are clean, dry and odorless, they are perfect for recycling. And the items don't even need to be separated. The eight collection organizations say just put clothes, shoes, towels, blankets, etc. in a plastic bag and drop them off at a clothing collection bin.

Past SMART president, Larry Groipen was at the event answering questions about recycling used textiles. "95% of all used clothing and household textiles can be recycled," says Groipen. "If the items aren't reused as clothing, they can be cut into industrial wiping or polishing cloths, or they may be shredded and processed back to their original fiber content. Those fibers are then used to manufacture new items such as household insulation, car soundproofing material, carpet padding, stuffing for sports equipment or pet bedding, and many other products."

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, approximately five percent of all trash is comprised of textiles. Rhode Island's Central Landfill buries approximately 800,000 tons of waste each year. Using the EPA's five percent figure that would mean 40,000 tons are used clothing and other household textiles that could have been recycled.

The Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation is a quasi-state environmental agency dedicated to providing the public with environmentally sound programs and facilities to manage waste. The agency helps fund and promote the state's recycling program, and owns and operates the Materials Recycling Facility and Central Landfill in Johnston, RI. For more information about recycling and waste in Rhode Island go to rirrc.org .

 


2014 Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles Association
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Archive

USED CLOTHING/TEXTILE RECYCLING KICK-OFF EVENT COLLECTS NEARLY 6,000 POUNDS FROM RHODE ISLAND RESIDENTS

ILLINOIS GOVERNOR SIGNS BILL ON CLOTHING COLLECTION BINS THAT MIRRORS SMART CODE OF CONDUCT

STATES ADOPTING EPA RULE ON INDUSTRIAL WIPING CLOTHS IN RESPONSE TO SMART's OUTREACH EFFORTS

THE TIDE MAY BE TURNING IN THE NEWS MEDIA REGARDING CLOTHING RECYCLING

MassDEP LEADS THE WAY ON PROMOTING TEXTILE RECYCLING

BUZZ LIGHTYEAR AND PINK TEDDY BEAR USED TO STOP THEFTS FROM CLOTHNG COLLECTION BINS

FIRST-EVER JOINT MEETING ON INTERNATIONAL USED CLOTHING INDUSTRY HELD IN MIAMI

SMART ASSOCIATION'S ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM CONNECTS WITH STUDENTS AND TEACHERS

SMART TAKES A LOOK AT THE EPA's MOST RECENT REPORT ON SOLID WASTE

SMART ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM CONTINUES TO REPORTS STRONG RESULTS

SMART ASSOCIATION CALLS FOR U.S. RETAILERS TO IMPLEMENT USED CLOTHING RECYCLING PROGRAMS

KENTUCKY ATTORNEY GENERAL SUPPORTS SMART ASSOCIATION'S REGULATORY RECOMMENDATIONS

NASCAR EVENT IN PHOENIX INCLUDED USED CLOTHING RECYCLING EFFORT

SMART MEMBER'S GATHER IN PHOENIX TO LEARN ABOUT NEW INITIATIVES IN THE INDUSTRY

RECYCLED CLOTHES RETURN TO RACKS AT NEW PRODUCTS AT H&M

SMART APPLAUDS EXPANSION OF SAN FRANCISCO'S ZERO WASTE PROGRAM TO INCLUDE TEXTILES

 

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